Joyce O’Connor’s recovery from Stroke Paralysis

By Joyce O'Connor's recovery

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On January 2, 2013, I woke up and couldn’t get out of bed. I told myself  “You can do it – you’ve done it every day of your life for 70 years.” But, I couldn’t. A friend stopped by but I couldn’t answer the calls at the door. She called my daughter who told her where there was an extra key she could use to get into the house. My daughter asked her to check on me. When she did, she found me on the floor. My daughter called an ambulance, which took me to the ER. It was determined that I had had a massive stroke. It left me paralyzed on my left side. I could not use my left arm hand, leg or foot. My house was two stories and five rooms; since we didn’t know how long I would be handicapped and I could no longer work or live in my home, my daughter and I decided it was time to sell the house. The business in my home and my work in a doctor’s office ended. All my possessions had to be sold in garage sales so that I didn’t have to pay to store them. It has been three and a half years, and I am still doing physical therapy. I am still not able to use my hand or arm, but I can now walk, step by step with a cane. I lost my ability to drive, I have to live in an assisted-living facility where cooking, laundry, showers and dressing are all done for me. For the last three years, I have had to be driven everywhere I need to go. In addition to the physical problems I have, I am also challenged by memory loss, an inability to work with numbers, and to read; I have been researching whatever I can in order to improve my life. Exhaustion is always close at hand, and I need to rest often.

Before the stroke, I had gone to the heart hospital to be evaluated for atrial fibrillation. My visit to the hospital showed nothing to be concerned with and they sent me home. Sometime later, I had a second bout of atrial fibrillation and went to see my doctor at the heart hospital clinic; he also dismissed me. Several months later I had the stroke. I don’t feel that I was properly diagnosed or treated by the medical community. People are now being put on blood thinners for stroke prevention, but they never offered me that option.  This stroke could have and should have been prevented!

I would like to include some mention of the work that I have been doing in since the stroke to improve my status.  With help getting on and off machines, and wrapping my left hand to the machines, I exercise three times a week at a rehab facility.  I have been enrolled in physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, water therapy and walking with a cane rather than a using wheelchair as much as possible.  But after three years, my recovery just hasn't been enough.

Every day I dream of regaining my full capabilities. I have been researching stroke recovery on my own, and stem cell therapy seems to be the primary rehabilitation option for stroke patients. In Europe and Asia, there has been much success with this, while in America we are further behind. I have found a doctor in Texas, after extensive searching, who is able to do the stem cell work for me. He was referred to me by my primary care physician. Stem cell therapy offers promise for my recovery, and I would very much like to pursue this treatment.

I am planning to have stem cell therapy done on June 7. I need to raise $7000.00 which will cover the treatment and related travel expenses. I would be forever grateful if you are able to help me with a donation.

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Project FAQ

The stem cell treatment is an IV of 20 million stem cells.  Stem cells are expected to double in the body every 24 hours.  Stem cells are expected to heal the damage as well as repair the immune system.  Alzheimer's patients have seen 80% recovery, Parkinson's patients have seen 90% recovery.  Sten cell therapy is also being used on cancer, multiple sclerosis, ALS, and joint & cartilage repair.

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